Cornell Law School Logo - white on transparent background

Category: Online

Cornell Law Review Online

Racial Reckoning With Economic Inequities

Lisa M. Fairfax,  Alexander Hamilton Professor of Business Law, George Washington University School of Law

In response to the racial reckoning sparked by the police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other unarmed Black men and women during the summer of 2020, many corporations publicly expressed their commitment to not only grapple with racial inequities in the economic sphere, but also increase racial diversity on their board, with particular…

Feb 2022

Cornell Law Review Online

Toward a Law and Politics of Racial Solidarity

Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Class of 1950 Herman B. Wells Endowed Professor of Law, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Guy-Uriel Charles, Edward & Ellen Schwarzman Professor of Law, Co-Director, Center on Law, Race, and Politics, Duke Law School

The killings of George Floyd, Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, and others have occurred under different factual circumstances, in different states, at the hands of both state and private actors, and have engendered different levels of outrage on the basis of their perceived egregiousness. Collectively and cumulatively, they have forced Americans to, once again, wrestle with…

Feb 2022

Cornell Law Review Online

Mitigating the PSLF Disaster: Building a Borrower-Friendly Student Loan Forgiveness Program

Michael Slomovics, J.D., Yale Law School, 2021

In 2007, Congress promised student loan forgiveness to our teachers, public defenders, nurses, and other public servants. The bargain was simple: spend ten years in public service and your debt will be eliminated. Unfortunately for borrowers, the program turned out to be a disaster, with loan forgiveness denial rates as high as 99%. Individuals frequently…

Nov 2021

Cornell Law Review Online

Do Reason-Based Abortion Bans Prevent Eugenics?

Sital Kalantry, Associate Professor of Law, Seattle University School of Law

This Essay discusses a lesser‑known case through which Roe v. Wade could be gutted—by declaring reason‑based bans constitutional.  If the Court finds that one reason‑based abortion ban is constitutionally permissible, it will open the door for states to destroy the fundamental right to abortion by enacting many more reasons for why abortion is impermissible.

Oct 2021

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––